Post filled under : organic food

  • September 20, 2017
Kai Restaurant has been given a 3 Star Rating by Food Made Good with an overall score of 88%. #Sustainability
 
The highlights was the ratings in categories such as:
Value Natural Resources 92%
Support the Community 97% Galway’s Westend
Celebrate Local and Seasonal 92%- All our suppliers, farmers and producers- Thank you
Waste no Food 95%- Walsh Waste
*Industry standard is 69%
 
Some info around food waste YOU need to know:
 
Wasting food burns both money and natural
resources.
 
The land needed to grow all the food we don’t eat is
larger than the size of China. Food waste costs
restaurants an average of 97p per meal, however, a
1300% return on investment could be seen if that
money was pre-emptively spent on reducing food
loss and waste instead.
 
Twitter Facebook Shareable Report rating 3 stars

Filled Under : Award , ethical , locally sourced , organic food , Press , Producers , restaurant galway

The biggest news this year- Galway’s Westend has been named as a finalist in this years Foodie Destinations with Restaurants Association of Ireland.

We as in GALWAY are battling it out against 9 other places in Ireland… we need your vote to showcase that as we already all know west is best and Galway is Class!

Click this link and vote #GalwaysWestend www.foodiedestinations.ie

VOTE HERE

Filled Under : Award , ethical , Events , food , galway , locally sourced , organic food

Galway Advertiser, May 09, 2013.

With Anne Marie Carroll

The last outpost of civilisation before you reach Salthill, when Kai opened, it opened with a bang and very quickly achieved a cult following. It suffered not a jot from teething problems, it was a fully formed concept practically from the word go. Kai was unpretentious and fun with flower and seed strewn salads piled on boards, big Ortiz tuna tins filled with bread, and the sun spilling through the skylight even on the dullest of days illuminating the lunchtime altar of cakes. Everyone’s favourite Kiwi chef Jess Murphy brings her own brand of kitchen voodoo and you know you are a regular when you grow to understand husband and partner-in-crime David Murphy’s accent at front of house.

Aside from the best brunch in town every Sunday, it is always well worth the extra trek and the couple of extra euro for the short, seasonal, lunch menu. Six or seven options that always showcase the best the west coast has to offer, from potted crab to gurnard fish finger sandwiches on Kai’s own foccacia, I have yet to be disappointed. Dinner is an equally short and ever changing menu with about five ‘beginnings’, ‘middles’, and ‘ends’.

I was last there for the cookbook club, held about once a month. This is a book club crossed with a supper club, where Jess and her team cook recipes from one book. Past books have included Ottolenghi’s book Plenty and Denis Cotter’s famous vegetarian cookbook Cafe Paradiso. The chosen book last month was What Katie Ate by Katie Quinn Davis. A great book, filled with lovely recipes and amazing photographs, it was one I had been promising myself. Originally a native of Dublin, now based in Australia, Katie Quinn Davis is a graphic designer turned food blogger and works as a freelance commercial photographer specialising in food.

I joined up with charming company, my new BFF, Jennie Browne from Goodness Cakes and reigning social media queen of Galway. We also had the wonderful Seamus Sheridan from Sheridan’s Cheesemongers and Peter Boland from Cases Warehouses at our table. Both were there to talk about the importance of local suppliers and supporting cottage industry, and also to introduce some wines and cheeses to the assembled diners. The dishes selected from the book came thick and fast from the kitchen, the best value three courses for €35 I have ever encountered.

Among the starter dishes were patatas bravas — spicy potatoes with crispy ham and wobbly eggs baked in enamel tins and served family-style to the table along with a red cabbage and fennel slaw, lightly dressed with a creamy, lemony, herbed yoghurt and studded with blood orange, goat’s cheese, and toasted pecans. There were jugs of lemon cordial with a hint of mint as well as the excellent wines. A creamy orecchiette pasta dish served in a pecorino sauce with scattered peas and pine nuts with pretty roasted vine tomatoes balanced on top and a generous bowl of wings and roasted limes to squeeze over.

For the second course Jess had chosen a lovely Panzanella with a punchy balsamic dressing and a fregola salad (a grain like giant couscous) with bacon and preserved lemons. A crunchy leek topped fish pie landed on the table alongside a ‘retro’ beef curry topped with caramelised bananas, piles of popadoms, and jars of relish, the dishes kept coming until there was barely room to set down your glass.

Dessert was a piquant rhubarb and hazelnut tart paired with an initially strange tasting strawberry, basil, and black pepper ice-cream, that grew on you eventually.

Alas that was the last cookbook club before the summer season kicks off, but the good news is that Kai is now opening seven days a week for your dining pleasure. Remember it seats just 45 so make sure you reserve a table, especially at weekends. The cookbook club will return after the summer, and I for one shall be keeping a beady eye on Kai’s Facebook page, so that I do not miss out on what is one of the best evenings out Galway has to offer. Totally Toto Africa.

Filled Under : ethical , food , galway , locally sourced , organic food , restaurant , restaurant galway

  • November 30, 2011

If you are a regular to Kai Cafe and Restaurant you will know that the Bluebell Falls Goats Cheese is one of our favourites and appears quite regularly on the menu.

In order to support local suppliers, and in the continuing quest to find the best local ethical produce we love to serve Bluebell Falls.

The unique goats cheese is produced on the Keane family farm in County Clare, where goats are fed indoors on fresh grass which is cut once a day. The same grass is given to the animals in the morning and again in the evening.

After the goats have eaten they are free to roam outside in the sun(when we have it), and at the first sight of rain, they are all back under cover again.

Fresh grass makes up 85 per cent of the goats’ diet and the remainder is made up of barley, oats and wheat. The high quality flavour of the milk comes from the wide variety of grasses that they eat.

The cheese is produced every day with the goats milked twice daily.

Milk from the evening is stored overnight at 4 degrees and mixed with the following morning’s milk to make a range of quality cheeses.

Milk is not sourced from any outside farms allowing all the cheese to be completely produced on the farm.

Because the Keanes love what they do, and do it so well, we are able to get the best highest quality product delivered direct from the farm to the restaurant in small batches so we always have an excellent cheese to offer you guys.

If your interested in getting some cheese visit their website for a list of shops that stock the amazing cheese, or you can buy online. http://www.bluebellfalls.ie/index.php?ID=5

Filled Under : ethical , food , galway , locally sourced , organic food , restaurant